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Firearm Trigger Control Training; Finger Placement Discipline, Dry Fire Drills with White Paper Target, Gun Grip & More

The general term “trigger control” refers to the act of moving the trigger and firing the gun without disturbing aim. Being that the fundamentals are rolled into firing the shot, trigger control, which is among them, is essential. Moving the trigger straight to the rear and firing the gun without disturbing aim is the best method of controlling a trigger for all levels of shooters. The preferred position for finger placement is having the middle of the pad on your fingertip, the most sensitive part of your finger. Being more important than putting the trigger finger in a preferred position on the trigger, maintaining the perfect aim as the shot is fired. Today, we at Shooting Range Industries would like to elaborate on trigger control.

Dry Fire Trigger Control Drills

Dry-firing exercises can help you with your trigger control. Dry-firing includes not using live ammunition in the training area and aiming only in a safe direction. To ensure that it will not harm your gun to dry fire it, consult the owner’s manual. Use a simple white sheet of paper as a target for dry-firing exercises. Without being distracted by either the sight picture or a natural wobble area, the white paper allows you to concentrate on sight alignment. Either move the trigger or move your finger should your front sight move during the dry-fire exercise. Though some triggers aren’t adjustable for position, moving the trigger is preferred. Moving your finger on the trigger, continue to dry fire as you do this until you find the spot where the sights don’t move as you pull the trigger. To get your finger positioned properly on the trigger, sometimes you must slightly adjust your grip, such as the position of the hand on the stock or grip. Make sure you remember it and enter the data in your shooter’s diary once you have found the correct location for your trigger finger. You must grip the firearm the same way every time. The contact point on the trigger finger may change from gun to gun and position to position.

Trigger Finger Discipline Exercise

This simple thumb-forefinger exercise is the best exercise. Start by extending your shooting hands in front of you. Palms should be vertical, fingers should be pointed away from your body, thumbs parallel with the bones of the forearm and inside the palm of the hand. Place the pad of your trigger finger against the end of your thumb. Increase the pressure smoothly to the rear against the thumb until your thumbnail is almost completely white. The gun should simulate a fired shot. Hold the pressure. Until the shot is fired, the color changes under your thumbnail shows that pressure on the trigger is increased smoothly. Whether or not the thumb is moved straight rearward as a trigger should be, the direction in which your thumb joint moves shows. You can practice with an air gun replica as well. In any case, trigger control is just as important as the other fundamentals of shooting.